Weekly Blog #5

Continue reading “Weekly Blog #5”

Advertisements

Peer Review #3

This week I chose to critique Alina’s letter to Mr. Gradgrind.

https://alinagoro.wordpress.com/2017/04/09/blog-4-week-6/

“Hi Alina, hope you don’t mind but I thought I’d use your entry to do my review on. I was looking to read someone’s letter to Mr. Gradgind and yours was the first I found.
I think you articulated your feelings towards Mr. Gradginds raising of Louise, my favorite line was “Put simply, she has been robbed of her childhood and as a consequence, she has become silent and detached.” as this feels like a direct verbal smack to Mr. Gradginds well deserved face. However, I think you could have gotten away with being a lot more punchey when it came to telling him off, but at the same time, I can understand why you chose to remain calm within your writing.

I look forward to seeing more of your posts in the future, have a great week!

-Adam.”

Blog Entry #4

This week I’ve decided to look at http://victorianweb.org/ (which totally looks like an early 90’s website) and see how useful it truly is. For this, I decided to do it in the style of a review. So saying that let’s get into it.

A bit about http://victorianweb.org/:
So you’re trying to learn about Victorian Era literature, but where do you go? My guess is most people at that point are already typing into google to find the first Wikipedia idle connected to the subject. Well instead head on over to http://victorianweb.org/. This site has a whole bunch of information about Victorian Era literature all in one, albeit rather dated looking site, ran by scholars who are experts in the field of Victorian Literature. I’m going to break this down into a couple of categories and give them a rating followed by an overall rating at the end, so strap in, get your old-timey monocles out and let’s go.

Information:
This site has a lot of information, and I don’t just mean a lot, I mean, A LOT, and it’s all verified by professionals of the field. You want a list of Victorian writers and texts? Too easy, You want information on what the scientific field was like back then? They got that too. Honestly, they have so much useful information pulling from all facets of the Victorian era that it would take at least a couple of weeks/months to read through. If it’s in the Victorian era, you’ll probably be able to find it on http://victorianweb.org/.

For the sites information content, I’m going to give it a 5 “dang that’s a lot of reading”‘s, out of 5. The sites just got so many different topics of interest that you’re guaranteed to find something of use that is verified by professionals.

Ease of use:
http://victorianweb.org/ is a pretty simple website, opening up with multiple clickable options categorized into different subjects, just click one of the blue boxes and you’re on your way to some of the Victorian goodness. Within each box, you’ll be taken to a page with more categories and clickable links regarding different topics to browse through, and at the bottom will even get a couple of boxes with related subjects within them to find similar information.I give Ease of use 5 “so easy my Grandma could use it” out of 5. Just like my rating sais, it’s so easy even my Grandma could use it…if she was still alive, Bless her dear heart.

I give Ease of use 5 “so easy my Grandma could use it” out of 5. Just like my rating sais, it’s so easy even my Grandma could use it…if she was still alive, Bless her dear heart.

Aesthetics:
Ok, this is where the site is let down. The site has an extremely dated feel to it which honestly could put a lot of people off, I know it put me off at first. But if you can see past this your going to be swimming in the amount of information available on the site. They definitely need to update the looks of the site, make it look a bit more modern, and this may just be me but they need to make the font on the sides bigger! For people like me who are blind like a bat, it was really hard to be able to read some of the information without either squinting half an inch away from the monitor or using the zoom function and bringing it up to at least 150%.

I give Aesthetics 1 “Damn, you looking fine”‘s out of 5.

Overall:
Overall http://victorianweb.org/ is a great site for learning about the Victorian era and all its nuances. It covers a large range of topics, in depth and is verified by professionals. It’s easy to navigate which is always a must when it comes to websites. It may look like a site straight from the days of dial-up but the information on this site is what we’re truly here for.

Saying that I give this site  5 “Hey, that’s pretty good”‘s out of 5. Because like I’ve said. were here for the brains not the looks.

Also here’s a useful link to Charles Dickens because were studying him.

http://victorianweb.org/authors/dickens/index.html

Peer review #2

This week I decided to review a great little piece by Annabelle, describing Sydney in the morning.

https://annabellebarnslicha.wordpress.com

Hi Annabelle,

I thought I’d critique your blog piece this week as I enjoyed reading the short paragraph describing Sydney. I think your spot on in the description, especially the “…on foot almost as fast as the buses traveling by them, or how fast they would be traveling if they were not caught up in piles and piles of backed up vehicles.” Section. Back when I had to travel into Sydney near-daily I always use to think that I could probably get off the current bus I was on and just walk to the next bus stop to catch the bus in front of mine. I actually did one day but as a result, I was soaked head to toe and had quite a miserably cold bus ride home. I really like the variety in the descriptions of others you saw walk past, as I’m fairly certain I’ve seen all of those kinds of people on those daily trips. Not much I can say about grammar, spelling or wording I think you captured Sydney in the early morning quite well.

 

-Adam.

Blog Entry #3 – A letter to Her Majesty.

For this week I took the ‘Letter to the Queen’ idea and decided to write as if I was someone of high enough status to frequently be in contact with the Queen and her family.

To Her Majesty The Queen.

I wish to inform you of a piece of information I have acquired with my travels to and from Her Majesty’s Palace.
Last night in my travels I had stopped at this small delightfully cozy tavern, not a single drunkard inside, I had only just begun my meal when I overheard two young men, they must have been but twenty and four talking about Her Majesty’s train carriage. They were discussing between each other that the royal carriage does not help the United Kingdom one bit. Now I do not wish to repeat the vulgar words that these young ruffians were using to address Her Majesty, but they said the icing on the cake was your royal carriage. That the carriage should be robbed and burnt to the ground for ever thinking such a display of wealth and snobbery would help the common folk. Oh, My Majesty the foul things these young ruffians were spouting out would have their mothers reeling in disgust. Why I have never been in such a mood. One of the young men, a short fellow with a scraggly beard even went as far to make a comparison to Her Majesty and a barnyard animal. Claiming that Her Majesty is less in touch with the common folk than a loon in a nuthouse.
I do urge Her Majesty to be careful whilst traveling in your lovely carriage as I do worry that such horrible words and thought could spread between the unhappy factory workers.
Please do take care.

Warmest Regards.

Mr. Adam Jones.