Shakespeare Peer Review #8

For peer review #8 I reviewed Lily’s first impressions of The Tempest.

https://lilychesterblog.wordpress.com/2018/05/21/first-impressions-of-the-tempest/

“Hey, Lily.

I can tell straight away from your blog that you’re really passionate about Shakespeare which is awesome. I enjoyed how knowledgeable your first impression was as you have clearly spent your time with the text to give us your opinion and in turn, has made me want to invest myself more into The Tempest so thank you for the motivation!

Adam”

 

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Shakespeare Peer Review #7

For this peer review, I decided to review Erin’s three things that for her would fall into the category of Beauty.

https://whatalittime.wordpress.com/2018/05/07/what-is-beauty/

“Hey, Erin.

I gotta say that this was an absolute pleasure to read and you definitely have a way with words.
I could vividly imagine each of these scenes as I read them and I think you did a wonderful job.

Thank’s this has completely brightened up my day.

Adam.”

Shakespeare Peer Review #6

For peer review #6 I have chosen to review Josh’s blog post in which he posted a summary of Theseus’ Anti-Imagination Speech.

https://joshuastrawblog.wordpress.com/2018/05/04/lovers-and-madmen-blogpost-6/

“Hey, Josh!

Fantastic blog entry, you can really tell that you enjoy studying Shakespeare through your passion displayed in this blog entry. I completely agree with you and Hippolyta that imagination is truly a “strange and admirable” thing to have and think life would just get a tad boring without it.

Keep up the great blogs!

Adam.”

 

 

Shakespeare Peer Review #5

For peer review #5 I chose to review Victoria’s synopsis of what Bottom is trying to express at the end of Act 4 Scene 1.

https://victoriakotsoris01.wordpress.com/2018/04/27/week-8-blog-post-5/

“Hi Victoria,

Great blog entry, I think you did a fantastic job of breaking down what Bottom was trying to express in this section of the play. I particularly liked you going into depth about the language used deconstructing why that particular language was used and what effect it had.

Great work, Keep it up.

Adam.”

Shakespeare Peer Review #4

For this peer review, I decided to review Alina’s letter, written from Hermia’s viewpoint to her father.

https://alinagoro.wordpress.com/2018/04/16/week-7-blog-4/comment-page-1/#comment-67

“Hey, Alina.
Awesome blog entry, I think you embodied Hermia perfectly. Showing not only her hatred for her father but her love for Lysander while critiquing the ways of that time period really made it seem authentic.
Also, the first crossed outline almost made me spit my drink out laughing so I appreciated that haha.

Awesome blogs!
Adam.”

Shakespeare Blog Entry #8

For the final Shakespeare blog entry I have decided to answer the second blog topic presented:

“Blog Topic 2: In Act 1 scene 2 what image do you get of Caliban? Is he being mistreated by Prospero”

After both watching the globe theatres rendition of The Tempest and reading along with a script the image I get of Caliban is that of a man who has been broken down over time by a cruel ruler, however, from Prospero’s perspective I can understand why he would have such a disdain for Caliban as he did try to rape Miranda. From his own description of event sit sounds as if Caliban, while uninhibited by the English language was a much more peaceful living man. He was one with the island and nature itself which in a way I think was a clever way for Shakespeare to make the audience question the role that language has on society and whether it truly makes us more civilised.

I can see both sides of the argument about his treatment from Prospero. On one hand, it would be very valid to argue that Prospero is a complete tyrant. Causing immense pain and suffering to be brought upon Caliban as well as essentially stealing the island from him.
On the other hand, I can also see the argument that Caliban brought this pain and suffering upon him when he tried to rape Miranda and that Prospero is doing what he is doing out of a mix of anger, resentment and to some extent fear, fear that his daughter was almost harmed by someone he helped become the man he is today. And despite knowing what extent I would be punished by the law if I were to commit violence against someone who attempted rape on my hypothetical daughter, It would be very hard to not do so.
Which at that point I ask my own question in response to anyone viewing this. Is Prospero’s mistreatment of Caliban warranted?scene-from-shakespeare-s-the-tempest-william-hogarth-a9433965.jpg

Shakespeare Blog Entry #7

For this blog entry I have chosen the topic:

“1/ What are your first impressions of the The Tempest.”

First off, I have never read or watched a play or movie adaption of the Tempest, so when I heard it was a comedy I was a bit thrown back. When I think of Shakespeare comedy is not often something that comes to mind. Usually, the first thing that pops into my head is a tragedy. However, after reading and getting to see a bit of the play I am really interested in watching and reading more. I think the premise of the story is quite interesting and look forward to delving into it in more depth. I also really liked the use of music within the segments we have already watched, from the heavy drum beats being used to represent a storm, to the hauntingly beautiful siren song that Ariel is able to use to draw different characters to specific points on the island.

I really look forward to seeing more and reading more of the Tempest, as I think it’s already becoming one of my favourite Shakespeare plays.